What is sexual consent?

What is sexual consent? Some people find this hard to understand. It should be as simple as asking would you like a cup of tea? I recommend that all high school and college students as well as their parents watch this 2.5 minute video to understand what is sexual consent.  It is estimated that 10 to 30 percent of all college students are involved in a sexual assault. The exact percentage is not important, it is a big number in either case.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGoWLWS4-kU

How NOT to Lose All Parental Rights to Your College Kid

By Tracey Ingle on September 7, 2018  www.inglelaw.com 

We’re just checking in here, because some things are worth repeating. Did you read the last article? It’s an important one, even though you may have brushed it aside the first time. We totally get it. You have a healthy new adult child off to college for the most amazing, memorable four years he or she may ever experience.

What’s the worst that could happen, right? Well, to be honest, a lot — especially if you choose to do nothing about it. You know your kid won’t do anything stupid. But what if?

Here’s the thing: The minute your kid reaches the magic age of 18, he or she is instantly deemed an adult in the eyes of the law and is entitled to all the same legal protections you and I take for granted. Now, you may say that’s a good thing, and you’d be correct. But what you may not realize is that the moment Junior is empowered make important life decisions, you are instantly cut off from accessing the medical and financial records that you’ve been in charge of since the day your baby came into your life.

It’s a major adjustment that you’ll need to deal with — but there’s a smart way to deal with it that still gives you the ability to make critical decisions for your college student in the event that he or she is unable to make them.

No matter how ill-equipped little Suzie might be for whatever curveballs life may throw at her, she’s in charge of her own decisions now — unless she says you can help.

This is not an invasion of privacy and she shouldn’t look at it as a way for Mom and Dad to keep her from experiencing full, independent adulthood. This is a support system that she can authorize to help her if she gets into trouble, whether it’s legal, financial, or medical.

Here’s the best advice we can give. Go back and read (or re-read) the previous article on Three “Must Haves” Before Kids Go to College. The logical you knows it’s the right thing to do, but emotional you is trying not to act as if you’re reluctant to give up your decision-making power. If you feel stuck or indecisive or even guilty for asking your own child to give you the right to help them when an urgent matter arises, just call us. Let’s set up an appointment to take care of your most precious asset before classes begin and life gets in the way and you’re powerless to help in a crisis.

Keep in mind that if you’re a member of our Most Trusted Advisor program, a Durable Power of Attorney and Health Care Proxy for your newly minted adult children are always free. For every other concerned parent, we’ll waive the on-boarding fee for the month of August.

Legal Needs for Your College Student – Part 3: Navigating Doctor-Patient Privacy

By Tracey Ingle on October 2, 2017  www.inglelaw.com 

Legal Needs for Your College Student – Part 3: Navigating Doctor-Patient PrivacyYour college student is enjoying life on campus – and hopefully attending classes! You’re the proud parent back home – checking in through texts and emails and Facebook – making sure your baby is happy, healthy, and at least occasionally eating something other than pizza!

And you’re excited that all the habits and values you’ve worked to establish seem to be paying off!

Now… imagine that your newly minted adult ends up in a medical situation and desperately needs your help. Unfortunately, once your child turns 18-years-old, they are legally an adult. That means that parents can no longer act on their behalf. Even if your child needs it!

Imagine you as a-parent-at-a-distance trying to help your child navigate the health care system and health care decisions. Sometimes it’s just easier if the parent can call the doctor to find out what’s going on. No dice.

But you don’t have to be out of the loop and leave your kiddo to fend for themselves!

Back in 1996, a federal law was passed: the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.  It became effective in 2006 and is the reason that every year we all sign off on having received a copy of the privacy policies of our doctor’s offices. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (or HIPAA) is essentially a federal codification of the long-standing patient-doctor privilege and was needed to govern the new age of electronically shipping information back and forth from doctor to insurance company and such.

That same law also gave patients the ability to waive their privacy rights as to anyone they saw fit.

You already know that your college-age young adult needs a Durable Power of Attorney to allow you to make non-health care decisions (read about a Durable Power of Attorney in Part 1, here) and a Health Care Proxy that allows you to make decisions about your child’s physical-self if there is ever a time they need you to by naming you their Health Care Agent. (Read about a Health Care Proxy in Part 2, here) but there’s one more legal document your child needs:

The HIPAA Release.

The reason this is so important is that a Health Care Proxy is only invoked if your child is unable to make or communicate or understand his/her own decisions.

That doesn’t apply if they’re healthy – but need help understanding the very adult world of healthcare. So if you’re trying to help them manage medical care or decisions, or need to understand the situation in order to make financial decisions, you might not be able to get that information.

In fact, without a HIPAA Release in place, the medical provider can’t even acknowledge that the child is a patient!

Now is the time to make sure that your child has an updated HIPAA Release in place. Your child needs to be home to create and sign one – but the paperwork doesn’t take long.  In fact, it’s usually a summary of whoever has been named in a Durable Power of Attorney and Health Care Proxy. Meaning, it’s a simple creation when doing all three at the same time.

And it’s worth your peace of mind!

While you’re getting the HIPAA for your college student set up, this is also a great time to review your own planning. Do you have a Durable Power of Attorney and a Health Care Proxy to appoint someone to take care of your needs? What about a HIPAA for your own needs? (Or the needs of an elderly loved one?)

Stop waiting! You need to get this done as part of being a responsible parent and modeling that behavior for your college student.

Here’s the truth:

You don’t have to have it all figured out before reaching out to a lawyer – for yourself or for your college student. Be a Good Guardian. Promise to protect your family, in writing. Apply for a FREE Good Guardian Strategy Session and in a short, complimentary phone call you can get clear on what is what is your best next step.

Apply Here – And make sure your family is taken care of.

Legal Needs for Your College Student Part 2: Medical Decisions

By Tracey Ingle on September 10, 2017
https://inglelaw.com/legal-needs-college-student-part-2/
Legal Needs for Your College StudentIt’s every parent’s worst nightmare: your child is injured or ill and you need to make the Big Decisions.

You consult with doctors, you get second opinions, you talk with your child’s other parent and trusted family. You will do whatever it takes to make the best possible decisions for your child’s health, happiness, and quality of life.

But… what if you can’t make those decisions.

Not because you don’t want to, but because your child is 18 – and in the eyes of the law, an adult. And in the eyes of the law – you have no rights or ability to make those critical decisions that impact your child’s long-term care or well-being.

To put it plainly:

Once your child turns 18-years-old, they are legally an adult. That means that parents can no longer act on their behalf. Even if your child needs it!

This can be even more terrifying if you’ve recently dropped them off at a college campus – across the state or across the nation. Doctors will stop sharing information with you. Yes, even Campus Health for a college education you’re paying for!

Imagine, you get The Call in the middle of the night. The call that no parent ever wants to receive. There’s been an accident and you should come right away. “No, I’m sorry, we can’t share any specific information due to medical privacy laws.” The whole drive, every worst-case scenario is flashing before your eyes.

Now, I don’t want to tell you that in every crisis you’d be powerless – in truth, many hospitals and doctors in an emergency will take their direction from a parent. The problem is that you have no guarantee of this. If the parents are estranged and have different opinions, the hospital is most definitely going to insist someone obtain legal authority to make decisions. But even in the absence of any controversy, a doctor or hospital is well within its rights to require this. Would you want to leave this to chance? Or worse, the whim of the hospital’s lawyer?

There is a way to still help your child and be involved with the “adult” and crisis decisions they’re making that they might not be fully ready to make. It’s by getting a Health Care Proxy for your newly minted adult or college student.

While a Durable Power of Attorney allows you to make non-health care decisions (read about a Durable Power of Attorney in Part 1, here) a Health Care Proxy allows you to make decisions about your child’s physical self if there is ever a time they need you to by naming you their Health Care Agent.

While this is traditionally thought of as end-of-life decisions, it’s more than that! It can include any decisions they’re not able to make for themselves. It could be a routine medical procedure, and while under anesthesia a decision needs to be made. Maybe there was an accident leaving your baby unconscious, or an accidental overdose or poisoning. There are any number of things that can result in loss of consciousness.

While you’re getting the Health Care Proxy for your college student set up, this is also a great time to review your own planning. If you’re the one incapacitated, do you have a Health Care Proxy to appoint someone to take care of your needs?

Stop waiting! You need to get this done as part of being a responsible parent and modeling that behavior for your college student.

Here’s the truth:

You don’t have to have it all figured out before reaching out to a lawyer – for yourself or for your college student. Be a Good Guardian. Promise to protect your family, in writing. Apply for a FREE Good Guardian Strategy Session and in a short, complimentary phone call you can get clear on what is what is your best next step.

Apply Here – And make sure your family is taken care of.

Legal Needs for Your College Student: Make Sure You Can Still Get Answers

By Tracey  Ingle on August 29, 2017
https://inglelaw.com/legal-needs-college-student/

Your little bird has flown the nest – and is safely installed as an adult on a college campus. No matter how big your baby is, you can still remember the moment you brought them home… You’ll always be a parent and they’ll always be your kid. You’re always there to do whatever it takes to take care of them – and that parental protective instinct can come out at a moment’s notice.

Except your newly minted-adult is, well… an adult.

Legal Needs for Your College Student

And while you still have what it takes to go all Mama Bear on anyone who wants to take advantage or hurt them (and all the nurturing instincts that go along with parenthood) in the eyes of the law – you have no rights or ability to help.

Once your child turns 18-years-old, they are legally an adult. That means that parents can no longer act on their behalf. Even if your child needs it! Like in the case of a conflict with the University (that you’re paying for!) or maybe because you just want to know from the school how things are going, or what mid-term grades looked like.

There is a way to still help you child and be involved with the “adult” decisions they’re making that they might not be fully ready to make. It’s by getting a Durable Power of Attorney for your college student.

What is a Durable Power of Attorney?

A Durable Power of Attorney for your college student appoints an Attorney-in-Fact who makes non-health care decisions. This is critical in case your child is ever incapacitated or unable to make his or her own decisions.

Traditionally, these are financial decisions, but in actuality, the powers of an Attorney-in-Fact are generally much broader and include things like making sure income tax returns are filed, requesting postal forwarding orders, handling memberships, pets, funeral arrangements, travel, or spiritual needs. Or allowing a college or university to share information with you around your child’s educational progress.

If your child has already gone off to school, don’t worry! Holiday breaks are just around the corner. Even a weekday afternoon at home is all you need to get this taken care of. Don’t put this off though! If getting a Durable Power of Attorney for your child is news to you – then make it a priority.

If you were aware that it was a smart part of parenting and let time slip away from you, then you might want to take a peek at the Check This Out free webinar from firm friend, Dr. Sarah Reiff-Hekking: I Know What to Do, I’m Just Not Doing It: 5 Steps to Bust Through Procrastination and Overwhelm.

While you’re getting the Durable Power of Attorney set up, this is a great time to review your own planning. If you’re the one incapacitated, do you have a Durable Power of Attorney to appoint someone to take care of your needs?

You don’t have to have it all figured out before reaching out to a lawyer – for yourself or for your college student. Be a Good Guardian. Promise to protect your family, in writing. Apply for a FREE Good Guardian Strategy Session and in a short, complimentary phone call you can get clear on what is what is your best next step.

Apply Here – And make sure your family is taken care of.

UC Berkeley Announces A New Integrated Business & Engineering Program

We’d like to let you know about a new program from UC Berkeley’s College of Engineering and Haas School of Business that is creating tomorrow’s tech founders and CEOs: the Management, Entrepreneurship, & Technology (M.E.T.) program.

 

Two Top Degrees in Four Years: Business & Engineering

M.E.T. students enroll in one UC Berkeley program but earn two Bachelor of Science degrees. The integrated and highly demanding curriculum can be completed in four years and offers five technology tracks:

As part of a small cohort of 50, students form a tight-knit community and benefit from close mentoring by industry executives and a Silicon Valley location, with access to hands-on learning and an abundance of career opportunities.

A Passion for Solving Big Problems

For this highly selective program, they seek top students from diverse backgrounds with interest and acumen in both technology and business and in leadership.

Students in their first cohort hail from 13 states and 5 countries.

Opportunity

Are Fraternities / Sororities for Me?

“When I was searching around for the college where I was to spend my next, formative 4 years of my life, I had a few criteria in mind: Strong academic reputation, D1 sports, and a vibrant student social scene. One key factor I wanted to avoid was a big Greek life population.I wanted to feel comfortably surrounded by a student body that featured people like me, but in addition, a broad mix of different backgrounds. I didn’t want the pressure of having to join a fraternity of homogenous, privileged people to have a good time. Ultimately, I settled on the University of Maryland, after considering Boston College, Richmond University, and others, and it was the best decision I’ve ever made in my life.

That being said, I don’t believe the decision would have been my best had I not been opening to altering my course. Remember the part where I said a major requirement for me was Greek Life not being a cornerstone piece of campus social scene? The same guy is talking to you now as a former Fraternity president, whose current job came from a greek life connection made while at school. By no means did I need to join Greek life at UMD, but I chose to, after consideration and consultation, and it made me into the man I am today. I was open to the idea that perhaps the fraternity stereotypes in my head were false, and I took the rush period to learn about the good things that I would then go on to do – fundraisers, community service, intramural sports, and leadership development trips. That being said, Greek life isn’t for everyone, and does have a decidedly negative stigma around it. My major point here is not that you should join a fraternity or sorority, but rather that you should keep an open mind, and certainly don’t make a school choice on something petty like preconceived notions of social scene.

Being open to trying new things is what college is all about, and while I wouldn’t promote being a “Yes Man”, I would say that before you jump to decline an offer to go on a school trip to a new city, or join a new club, give it a chance! College is a time for meeting new people, trying new things, and finding out what you like and dislike. Trial and error is the best method. Even extend this method into class selection. No matter your major, you should at some point in your 4 years, have the opportunity to take a class that interests you. Expand your horizons! Take a photography class, a classical music seminar, or contemporary philosophy! You might just stumble into something you love, and want to pursue. I entered school as a psychology major, being that it was all I knew. Both my parents were in the mental health field, and I just assumed I’d follow suit. Sophomore year, I took a business class, and was captivated. I added Business as a second major, and today I work in the corporate world, with the psychology serving to aid me, but the business background driving my role.

I guess my point in all this is that don’t stress too much over your college choice, and make sure you are prioritizing the right issues for you at that time. But to be honest, chances are, things will change. When you go to school, you will grow, whether that be in a totally different direction, or in strengthening your current high school senior values. Regardless, don’t be afraid to let the road drag you where it may, and enjoy the ride!”

Jake Barringer

Sales Management Associate

PepsiCo Beverages North America

(617) 459-2371

March Madness is Choosing a College

March is a month for nail-biters – fans on edge with basketball madness and high school seniors anxiously waiting to hear from colleges. Choosing a college is a big decision, one that impacts the next four years of a student’s life and a lot of money, typically $120,000 for an in-state public college or close to $270,000 for an out-of-state or private college.

When researching colleges, families may not ask one of the most important questions – what percentage of students graduate in four years? If it takes longer than four years to graduate, that’s more than four years of tuition. One college that lost early in the tournament has a great four-year graduation rate – University of Virginia with a four-year graduation rate of 86%. Compare that with Georgia State’s rate at 21%.

Another important question is what percentage of students return for the second year? This statistic is called retention rate, and there’s a 20-point difference this year in retention rates of the colleges in the tournament! University of Virginia, University of Michigan and Duke all boast retention rates of 98% versus UNC-Greensboro’s lower 77% retention rate.

Nationwide 27% of students do not return for year two. When students transfer, not all their credits are likely to transfer, thus adding to the cost of that college diploma. No one wants to pay for an extra semester or year of college at these prices.

So, remember choosing a college to attend is not the same as choosing your favorite March Madness pick.

2018 March Madness PDF

4 Year Graduation Rates?

College Volunteer Helps Save Lives at Suicide Hotline

Eight in ten people considering suicide give some sign of their intentions, according to Mental Health America. Some people will make comments like “You’d be better off without me.” Some people abuse substances. Others call a suicide hotline, and if they do, Melissa Bendell might just be on the other side of the line.

Melissa Bendell is a 20-year-old college student from Framingham, Massachusetts. When she was a junior in high school, Melissa started volunteering at Call2Talk, a confidential mental health and emotional support call line that provides a safe place to talk to anyone going through a hard time in their lives. Callers often admit to suicidal thoughts, and volunteers are trained to inform callers of their options and connect them with other resources that can help.

“By sharing their personal stories of tragedy, recovery, despair, and grief,” its website proclaims, “callers feel relief, comfort, and hope.”

What started out as a way for Bendell to earn service hours for National Honors Society became meaningful work she would continue to do long past high school.

“This is something no one really talked about,” Bendell said. “I kept doing it because it is important to offer this service that so many people need. I didn’t realize how many people in my community were depressed, suicidal or going through tough times so it really opened my eyes to the fact that you really don’t know what people are going through.”

According to Mental Health America, Suicide is the eighth leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for more than 1% of all deaths. 30,000 Americans die by suicide each year, and an additional 500,000 Americans attempt suicide annually. This volunteer opportunity allowed Bendell to understand the people behind the statistics.

As she enters her junior year as a Spanish and Public Relations major at American University in Washington, DC, she is still involved in her community. Bendell returns as a volunteer on school breaks.

“It’s not really something you can do once and then never do again,” she said. “You go through training for months, and then you have the same callers call you. You learn a lot about them, make connections with them and you get to see them grow or heal.”

Throughout the job, she’s learned the value of communication, which has influenced her choice of study in college. Her conversations are confidential and often emotionally taxing. It’s not the easiest after-school job, but she says it’s worth it.

“I talked to someone for about an hour one day,” she said, “and they called back the next day and told the caller that I saved their life and that they were so thankful that I was there. I honestly almost cried I was so touched.”

UNITED WAY OF TRI-COUNTY – CALL2TALK

https://www.uwotc.org/call2talk

Call2Talk is a confidential mental health and emotional support call line that assists individuals and families through stressful times in their lives, helping the despondent and those who may be suicidal.

Harvard Admits a Freshman Class and Whites are the Minority

For the first time in its nearly 400-year history, Harvard has admitted a majority nonwhite class, The Boston Globe reported.

Official figures released by the college show that the entering class of 2021 is:

• 22.2% Asian American 

• 14.6% African American

• 11.6% Hispanic or Latino 

• 2.5% Native American or Pacific Islander 

Of the entering freshman class, 50.8% are from minority groups, an increase from the 47.3% figure last year, The Globe reported.

The news comes just as the Department of Justice indicated it planned to review a complaint of discrimination at Harvard University related to its admissions process.

An anti-affirmative action group called Students for Fair Admissions filed a lawsuit against Harvard in 2015, alleging that the college and other Ivy League institutions use racial quotas to admit students to the detriment of more qualified Asian-American applicants. The group includes a coalition of more than 60 Asian-American groups.

See College Solutions founder, Larry Dannenberg, on Fox 25 News.