The College That Fits Your Child: Pasadena Seminar 10/2/18

Looking to find the college that best fits your child or to obtain free money?  We will show you how to find schools that are the right fit as we walk you through the admissions process.  Learn about merit money opportunities and what you can do to better your child’s chances of receiving this free money, regardless of whether your child is a top student or an average student.

Understand why starting the college early can offer significant advantages. This seminar class is particularly important if your student is at the top of the class, has learning differences, is an athlete, or is average. See what it takes to get into an Ivy and why your child may be rejected from the school you considered to be a “safety” school.

2018 was a year of significant change, Standardized testing has changed, admissions have become more competitive than ever, and a new “Coalition” application is being used by some colleges. In addition, the financial aid application process has undergone recent changes that require planning in the freshman year of high school.

Parents who are separated, divorced, or never married will learn what they should know about financial aid. Dr. Lee Ann Cornell has spent years working in this field and has a wide breadth of knowledge on this subject and a staff of recognized experts to help your child achieve their dreams.

Immigrant parents or parents whose children will be the first in their family to attend college will find this class very helpful.  You will learn the subtleties of the college process and develop an understanding of how your child may be at a disadvantage at some schools and have advantages at others.

Dr. Lee Ann Cornell manages the California practice of College Solutions. She brings ten years of admission experience from several colleges. Dr. Cornell understands exactly how to position a student in the admission process. She specializes in essay brainstorming and editing, as well as application mapping.

Finding the College That Fits Your Child: Lexington Seminar 9/26

Looking to find the college that best fits your child or to obtain free money?  We will show you how to find schools that are the right fit as we walk you through the admissions process.  Learn about merit money opportunities and what you can do to better your child’s chances of receiving this free money, regardless of whether your child is a top student or an average student.

Understand why starting the college early can offer significant advantages. This seminar class is particularly important if your student is at the top of the class, has learning differences, is an athlete, or is average. See what it takes to get into an Ivy and why your child may be rejected from the school you considered to be a “safety” school.

2016 was a year of significant change, Standardized testing has changed, admissions have become more competitive than ever, and a new “Coalition” application is being used by some colleges. In addition, the financial aid application process has undergone recent changes that require planning in the freshman year of high school.critical-thinkings-is-key-in-college

Parents who are separated, divorced, or never married will learn what they should know about financial aid. Larry Dannenberg has spent years working in this field and has a wide breadth of knowledge on this subject. He wrote the chapter on financial aid in the “Financial aspects of divorce” for the MCLE and lectures on the subject at numerous financial planning groups.

Immigrant parents or parents whose children will be the first in their family to attend college will find this class very helpful.  You will learn the subtleties of the college process and develop an understanding of how your child may be at a disadvantage at some schools and have advantages at others.

Larry Dannenberg, founder of College Solutions, is a professional college placement counselor with a deep understanding of the financial aid process.  College Solutions prides itself on a record of over 15 years of successful service in college placement and financial aid.

Register at Lexington Community Education
The $25 tuition is for two adults in the household. 146 Maple Street, Lexington, MA 02421 | tel: 781 862 8043 | info@lexingtoncommunityed.org

The seminar is being offered twice in upcoming weeks — on September 26th from 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM at Lexington High School.

 

Finding the College That Fits Your Child: Sharon Seminar 9/27

students walking through the gate at StanfordLooking to find the college that best fits your child or to obtain free money?  We will show you how to find schools that are the right fit as we walk you through the admissions process.  Learn about merit money opportunities and what you can do to better your child’s chances of receiving this free money, regardless of whether your child is a top student or an average student.

Understand why starting the college early can offer significant advantages. This seminar class is particularly important if your student is at the top of the class, has learning differences, is an athlete, or is average. See what it takes to get into an Ivy and why your child may be rejected from the school you considered to be a “safety” school.

2016 was a year of significant change, Standardized testing has changed, admissions have become more competitive than ever, and a new “Coalition” application is being used by some colleges. In addition, the financial aid application process has undergone recent changes that require planning in the freshman year of high school.

Parents who are separated, divorced, or never married will learn what they should know about financial aid. Larry Dannenberg has spent years working in this field and has a wide breadth of knowledge on this subject. He wrote the chapter on financial aid in the “Financial aspects of divorce” for the MCLE and lectures on the subject at numerous financial planning groups.

Immigrant parents or parents whose children will be the first in their family to attend college will find this class very helpful.  You will learn the subtleties of the college process and develop an understanding of how your child may be at a disadvantage at some schools and have advantages at others.

Larry Dannenberg, founder of College Solutions, is a professional college placement counselor with a deep understanding of the financial aid process.  College Solutions prides itself on a record of over 15 years of successful service in college placement and financial aid.

Register at Sharon Community Education
The $2o tuition,  | tel: (781)784-1574 or (781)784-2333 | www.sharoncommunityeducation.com

The seminar is being offered on September 27th from 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM at Sharon High School.

 

The Magic Potion:  The 2 R’s—Research and Reading

What do colleges actually want?  Students, parents, advisors, and teachers alike ask themselves this question every year as they wade into the college admission process. colleges-want-research

The truth is:  colleges want students who are passionate about learning.  They don’t want students obsessed with being perfect.  They don’t want straight A’s for the sake of straight A’s.  Colleges want students who truly love to learn.  Students who will go out of their way
to find the answer to a question, just because they’re interested.  Students who volunteer to stay after class to help with an experiment because they wonder how it will turn out.  Students who happily wander through a bookstore or the library, hoping to find something new and interesting to learn.

When a college chooses to interview a student, one of the first questions they ask a student is “What are you reading?”.  Sure, a student can spout titles from the summer reading list, but any admission professional knows these lists like the back of their hand.  Scarlett Letter?  Fahrenheit 911?  Unbroken?  Catcher and the Rye?  The Things They Carried?  Colleges know all of these.  What else?  You’d be amazed by the confused looks students get on their faces when they realize their summer reading list books simply aren’t enough for top-tier schools.

Love of learning is not something a student can fake.  And it’s not something that develops overnight.  How can you foster a child’s love of learning and therefore improve his/her chances in the college admission process?

schoolboy with open book on white background. Isolated 3D image

  1. Promote reading for the sake of reading. More often than not, students are choosing their smart phones over leisure reading.  Students should be exploring new topics through reading. They should develop passions o
    utside of the summer reading list.   Students should aim to read at least 3-5 books for pleasure each year of high school.
  2. Innately, reading will develop a sense of curiosity and most often this curiosity then lends itself to research. Colleges are most interested in students who have an interest in or experience with research. This could be at the high school level (chemistry projects) or it could be at the college level (summer research with a professor).  Encourage children to ask questions.  This is where research begins.  From there, research follows a student’s relationship with his/her teachers.  If a student is interested in English, go meet with the teacher.  Perhaps he/she could use some help in reading more about the Bronte sisters.  Interested in anatomy?  Perhaps the anatomy teacher knows an area college professor for whom the student could work over the summer.

In sum, curiosity is key.  Students must foster a sense of curiosity early in their high school career so that this quality can serve them in college and even beyond.  Reading and research—this is the magic potion that creates a competitive college application.

 

 

 

Eight Points For 8th Graders To Consider About College

Getting started early, talking about college with your child will help prepare them for the process of finding the right college but also finding interests and passions that will lead them to an ultimate career path. It all starts with getting involved early – in academics, extracurriculars and college research.

Here are some tips of how to get started in middle school:

1. Talk about college
Set expectations that your child will go to college and that there are lots of colleges to choose from. Talk to your child about her interests and how they might translate into a college major and career.

2. Choose a high school (if you have a choice)
Many families have a choice where to send their children for high school: private, public, charter, or governor’s school. Explore the academic and non-academic programs that each offers, the different grading systems, average SAT or ACT scores of students, and the colleges that graduates attend. Find a high school that will support your child’s interests and dreams.

3. Understand the grading system
High schools have different policies for course selection and grading. Some schools do not ‘weight’ grades, so an “A” in the hardest course looks the same as an “A” in the easiest course. Colleges will not realize this, they see an “A” as an “A”. Some high schools limit which courses you can take depending on how you performed in that subject the prior year. Understand the high school’s system.

4. Help your child choose classes
Grades are the most crucial application element for admission decisions. Colleges consider the rigor of student course loads and want to see students taking increasingly difficult courses each year. Colleges expect students to take:
• Math: every year, and the more rigorous the better, as long as you can get a “B” or better.
• English: all four years
• History: all four years
• Science: every year and at least two years of a lab science.
• Foreign language: Many colleges require at least two years of a language for admission and many require a foreign language for college graduation.
Your child will need to satisfy more than these (the basic high school graduation requirements) in order to succeed in college.

5. Get savvy about college costs
College financial aid is based on the prior, prior year (for a high school senior, aid is based on the family’s tax returns from the child’s sophomore year), so developing a strategy now and managing your income and assets early can pay off. Look up the Cost of Attendance (tuition, fees, room, and board) for your state schools and any private schools your child would consider. Use the “net price calculator” on the college websites to get an estimate of what you will have to pay. If your family is not considered need-based, there are other sources of money. Type “scholarship” in the search box on each college website for merit money offered.

6. Encourage your student to read, read, and read some more
The best preparation for the SAT and ACT is reading.

7. Define your passion and make summers count
Help your child find her passions. Explore ways to get involved doing something she loves. Don’t let her waste her limited time. Summer experiences should be fun and meaningful, but serve a purpose: avoid “teen tours” or “mission trips” to other countries where students are more ‘tourists’ than active ‘participants.’ Many summer programs have deadlines in late fall or early in the spring semester, so get a head start on summer plans. Community service can also enhance your skill set or help you develop new skills.

8. Develop good study habits and don’t wait to get help
Nearly every child needs help with time management, organizational and study skills. Addressing these issues now is easier than when the work gets more challenging. Set up a quiet place for your child to do homework and help him get into a routine. If you or your child think they may need help in a class, find another high school student, a local college student, or a tutor to help. If you suspect your child has learning differences, get testing done now so that your child enters high school with a well-structured learning program that works.

See College Solutions founder, Larry Dannenberg, on Fox 25 News.